Delloy Pasta

 

History of Delloy Pasta

It started out as a sideline to complement their cow-calf operation, but now Bill and Charmaine Golding find themselves turning out pasta on a full-time basis. The Goldings farmed near Borden, Saskatchewan.

 

In December, 2000, they acquired Delloy Pasta, a noodlemaking business, from Charmaine’s aunt and uncle. From the basement of their home, Delores and Lloyd Derksen (hence the name, Delloy) ran the business for about five years, and the Goldings had expressed interest in it.

 

Then one day, they got the phone call. The timing was perfect, because they had just closed a home-based group home that they had operated for 14 years. Bill and Charmaine moved a small school portable onto their property to begin production. They had an established

customer base to satisfy.

 

In 2005, they outgrew that facility, and decided to take the plunge. They purchased a large commercial lot in Borden, facing Highway 16. The location was perfect to draw new customers from the busy highway.  They built a 2200 square foot production plant with a small store front. 

 

The method is simple: No additives or preservatives, only eggs, water and flour are mixed into 35 pound batches by an “ancient, but efficient mixer”. An auger extruder pushes the dough through a screen into long strands that are cut with a knife into lengths suitable for packaging. Then they are dried, packaged and sealed manually.

 

They take a lot of time and care to make a quality home-style pasta.  Not only does Delloy Pasta make regular egg noodles, kielke, and pre-packaged soups, they also make whole wheat pasta which has become more popular over the years. The newest product is Spelt Pasta, suitable for most people sensitive to gluten.  

 

With a booming Saskatchewan market, and the desire to eat healthy, home-style, locally-produced food, the possibilities are endless. They have had countless compliments about their products, and customers have taken pasta and other food home to enjoy, even as far as the United States. One woman bought cabbage rolls, sausage and pasta to take home for supper to Arizona, knowing it would stay frozen in the belly of the plane!